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Beehive Strong Group

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Luke Thomas
Luke Thomas

PHYSICS 2600 INTRODUCTION TO MEDICAL PHYSICS COURSE SYLLABUS.pdf


Introduces mechanics of motion. Designed for concentrators in sciences other than physics-including premedical students. PHYS0030 applies algebra, geometry, trigonometry and analytic geometry. Students with a strong background in calculus should consider taking PHYS0050 or 0070 instead. Consists of lectures and laboratory.




PHYSICS 2600 INTRODUCTION TO MEDICAL PHYSICS COURSE SYLLABUS.pdf



This course introduces the fundamental elements of electrical and magnetic phenomena, optics and wave optics, as well as selected modern physics topics. Materials are introduced through lectures, workshops and laboratory exercises. The topics covered include: the electric force, field and potentials, circuits and circuit elements, magnetic fields and magnetic phenomena, induction, electromagnetic waves, optics, interference and diffraction, wave-particle duality and the photoelectric effect, and radioactivity. The course is taught at a level that assumes familiarity with algebra and trigonometry, but no calculus. Students with a strong background in calculus should consider taking PHYS0060 instead.


This course, aimed at both students in the humanities and sciences, will explore the myriad surprising ways that jazz music is connected to modern physics. No background in physics, mathematics or music is required, as all of these foundational concepts and tools will be introduced.


This course is a first course in astronomy and astrophysics, serving as the preferred gateway for students considering a physics concentration in the astronomy track. The course introduces the sky and the tools needed to study celestial objects, and ranges then from stars, galaxies, clusters and the largest scales, to the universe' evolution, and returns to solar system formation, exoplanets and SETI. Significant evening lab and problem sets are at a higher level than the outreach course PHYS0220, as is the associated assumed math and physics understanding.


The necessary framework for Quantum mechanics is developed carefully and used to link and explain both the older and newer experimental phenomena of modern physics. This is the first of a two-semester sequence. In P-1410, the main focus is on 1-D quantum physics, leaving 3-D to P-1420. The course has been taught in recent years following the approach of Sakurai, but at a junior-level, e.g., adopting the text by Townsend. The mathematics that we will use includes basic calculus. Linear transformations on complex vector space serve as essential tools for describing quantum physics.


The course aims to help physics students learn basic of thermodynamics and develop microscopic understanding of it based on elementary statistical mechanics. That is, the concepts of thermodynamics and statistical mechanics are introduced from a unified view. Students will develop understanding and importance of quantities such as entropy, negative temperature, and behavior of quantum gases. The emphasis is on real-world applications.


The course aims to help PhD and MSc students learn experimental methods and develop experimental and scientific communication abilities in major areas of modern physics. We discuss the application of the scientific method. Four major experiments are conducted during the semester. Students develop skills including observing and measuring physical phenomena, analyzing and interpreting data (primarily using Python notebooks) clearly identifying and including possible sources of errors, and also reaching conclusions and publishing experimental results. Students also learn scientific presentation skills and how to read published results and references with appropriate judgment.


The course provides an introduction to Solid State physics. We discuss free electrons, band theory, crystalline symmetries, semiconductors, magnetism and topological band theory. Students are expected to be familiar with quantum mechanics and statistical mechanics.


Introduces mechanics of motion. Designed for concentrators in sciences other than physics-including premedical students. PHYS0030 applies algebra, geometry, trigonometry and analytic geometry. Students with a strong background in calculus should consider taking PHYS0050 or PHYS0070 instead. Consists of lectures and laboratory.


This course introduces the fundamental elements of electrical and magnetic phenomena, optics and wave optics, as well as selected modern physics topics. Materials are introduced through lectures, workshops and laboratory exercises. The topics covered include: the electric force, field and potentials, circuits and circuit elements, magnetic fields and magnetic phenomena, induction, electromagnetic waves, optics, interference and diffraction, wave-particle duality and the photoelectric effect, and radioactivity. The course is taught at a level that assumes familiarity with algebra and trigonometry, but no calculus. Students with a strong background in calculus should consider taking PHYS0060 instead. PHYS0030 or a strong background in high-school level mechanics is strongly recommended.


This course provides a calculus-based introduction to the principles and phenomena of electricity, magnetism, optics, and the concepts of modern physics. It is intended for science concentrators and emphasizes the conceptual understanding of the principles of physics and the development of the calculation skills needed to apply these principles to the physical universe.


This course will introduce students to the fundamental laws that govern energy and its use. Physical concepts will be discussed in the context of important technological applications of energy. The physical concepts include mechanical energy, thermodynamics, the Carnot cycle, electricity and magnetism, quantum mechanics, and nuclear physics. The technological applications include wind, hydro, and geothermal energy, engines and fuels, electrical energy transmission and storage, solar energy and photovoltaics, nuclear reactors, and biomass.


This course is a mathematically rigorous introduction to special relativity, waves, and quantum mechanics. It is the second in a 3-semester sequence for those seeking the strongest foundation in physics and is also suitable for students better served by an introduction to modern physics rather than electromagnetism.


This course teaches quantum mechanics through experiment, provides insight into modern physics and some important historical background. In addition, this course develops laboratory and data analysis skills, exposes students to relatively modern experimental research techniques, and gives students feeling for how experiments are designed. It is a writing course that develops scientific writing skills. At the same time, the presentation component develops oral communication skills.


Phys 1170 provides a qualitative introduction to modern elementary particle physics for undergraduate students. The focus of the course is the standard model of particle physics, which has been remarkably successful in describing the properties and behavior of elementary particles and fields, fundamental building blocks of our Universe. Topics of current interest, new developments, and outstanding problems will also be highlighted. A brief overview of experimental methods, such as methods of detecting elementary particles, detector and accelerator design, will be given. To take this course, you need to take at least two semesters of quantum mechanics: first semester of quantum mechanics PHYS 1410 or equivalent; second semester of quantum mechanics 1420 could be taken concurrently.


This course is an introduction to the astrophysics of stars: their structure, formation, and evolution. Because stars do not exist in a vacuum (just close to it!), we will also spend time discussing important considerations regarding the gas between the stars (the interstellar medium) and its relation to stars, star formation, and evolution. Understanding how stars work is essential to understanding the Universe. Together with PH1270 (Extragalactic Astrophysics) and PH1280 (Cosmology), this course is part of a sequence aimed at covering all of astrophysics.


This course provides hands-on experience with some of the experimental techniques of modern physics and, in the process, to deepen the understanding of the relations between experiment and theory. The students will do six experiments on phenomena whose discoveries led to major advances in physics. For many of the experiments, you would have won a Nobel Prize if you had been the first to do it.


Medical Physics is an applied branch of physics concerned with the application of the concepts and methods to the diagnosis and treatment of human disease. It allies with medical electronics, bioengineering, health physics. Students will familiarize themselves with major texts and literature of medical physics and are exposed to imaging and treatment techniques and quality control procedures. Students will acquire physical and scientific background to pose questions and solve problems in medical physics. Topics include Imaging -imaging metrics, ionizing radiation, radiation safety, radioactivity, computed tomography, nuclear medicine, ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, and Radiation Therapy -delivery systems, treatment planning, brachytherapy, image guidance.


This is a course on topology in physics which does a minimal amount of elementary topology. The major topic is the theory underlying the recently discovered materials called topological insulators and what makes them different from ordinary or trivial insulators. The experimental situation is also reviewed. 350c69d7ab


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